Artists

Petri Ala-Maunus

FINLAND | Works in Tampere

Petri Ala-Maunus’s (1970) Paradise-like images may appear to us as ideal landscapes but at the same time are playing kitsch. The works represent an imagery that, perhaps surprisingly, is recognisable and they can be seen as commenting on questions of good and bad taste. With his careful, laborious brushwork and the slow emergence of beauty on his canvas he in the end avoids kitsch and takes his paintings to greater and more profound mental landscapes. The paintings that at first glance look realistic create their own utopian world.

Nightclubbing in Never-Never Land

2013

oil on canvas

140 x 170 cm

Emil Ásgrímsson

ICELAND | Works in Reykjavík

Emil Ásgrímsson (1985) leads the spectator into game worlds of narrative landscapes and fantasies. In his works he combines different techniques, such as animation and collage. Behind his arcane worlds lies a carefully controlled narrative, where he playfully brings together new technology and more traditional media.

Sjónarhorn / Perspective

2013

animation and installation

Sjónarhorn / Perspective

2013

animation and installation

Søren Thilo Funder

DENMARK | Works in Copenhagen

Søren Thilo Funder's (1979) First Citizen (House of the Deaf Man) opens in a small room, where a therapist is in consultation with a young man. Through the use of hypnosis, the young man is experiencing a manipulation of his unconscious motivation. A feeling of debt is implanted in him through psycho-suggestion. First Citizen (House of the Deaf Man) proposes the idea that the indebtedness of the citizen is not only a causality of a flawed economic system, but also the last relation that connects the citizen to a community. The only sure way to be part of any power relation is to enter the creditor/debtor relationship. Debt might hence be something that the citizen unconsciously desires – as the only means of experiencing community.

First Citizen (House of the Deaf Man)

2013

HD video

00:12:30

Heidi Hove

DENMARK | Works in Copenhagen

Heidi Hove's (1976) work is inspired by the archaeological fragments in Aboa Vetus and two childhood memories. One is of a piece of glass that hurt her foot in the garden. The other is of her grandfather, a farmer, who collected every stone he found in his fields. Hove exhibits broken pieces from her parents´ garden and a vision of the original dinner plate. The other part of her installation is a photo of her grandfather's pile of stones, combined with a large stone she has transported to Finland.

Backyard history I

2013

found objects and reproductions in display case

Backyard history II

2013

colour print, granite boulder

Stine Marie Jacobsen

DENMARK | Works in Berlin

Stine Marie Jacobsen (1977) is interested in how information changes in society as it is passed on between people. The roots of the work Idle no More are in the age-old traditions of story-telling. When preparing the work the artist went to the streets of Turku and Berlin and asked people, what the word ”idyll” brings to their mind. In the video a group of strangers meet and improvise on the basis of excerpts of the conversations held in the streets of Turku and Berlin. The conversation was filmed, and the sound was sent to Nis Bysted from the Danish rock band Thulebasen to be mixed. The result is an alternative music video.

Idle no More

2013

HD video 00:17:00

Lisa Jeannin

SWEDEN | Works in Hakebo

Lisa Jeannin's (1972) Me Tarzan You Insane is about a scientist who goes on a trip to Africa to study evolution. He adopts a monkey and brings it back to his wife in Malmö. The monkey, Tarzan, lives with its parents and goes to school. In spite of this it becomes sort of an outsider. Finally Tarzan gets a job delivering mail, but does the story have a happy ending? The video is like a modern silent film or fable, through which Lisa Jeannin shows the absurdities of our society.

Me Tarzan you Insane

2013

HD video

00:19:58

Me Tarzan you Insane

2013

HD video

00:19:58

Tilda Lovell

SWEDEN | Works in Stockholm and Berlin

Tilda Lovell (1972) often uses objects found from nature in her fantastic installations. Skulls of small birds, animal bones or tree roots come to life again in her hands. Lately Lovell has been interested in the curious world of Hieronymus Bosch. Lovell has re-created creatures from Bosch's paintings in her works, the dimensions of which are often defined by the limits of a table. Her work gives space for dreams and the unconcsious side of life.

Untitled Landescape

2013

installation and animation

Untitled Landescape

2013

installation and animation

Mom & Jerry

DENMARK

Mom & Jerry consider themselves living, nomadic pieces of art. They see their surroundings as a stage for their everlasting protest and rebellion against established values, political correctness and snobbery. As artists and provocateurs, Mom and Jerry attempt to criticise and mock the elitist, hierarchical structure of the high art machinery. Mom and Jerry ridicule and question the validity of the establishment's defined moral values, as well as the issue of good and bad taste.

Can You Handle the Truth?

2013

installation

Valeria Montti Colque

SWEDEN | Works in Stockholm

Valeria Montti Colque's (1978) art encompasses a universe of figures that in different ways portray mankind’s existence on earth. She works with a wide variety of media, using performance, photo collage, video, masks and costumes, installations, drawing and al fresco mural painting. Central to Valeria Montti Colque’s art are myths. In her works she uses myths from many different cultures. In the work Gold Heart Crystal Soul she borrows from the myth of Lilith, the first spouse of Adam.

Gold Heart Crystal Soul

2013

drawing, water colour, installation

207 x 144 cm

Gold Heart Crystal Soul

2013

drawing, water colour, installation

207 x 144 cm

Mercedes Mühleisen

NORWAY | Works in Oslo

Mercedes Mühleisen's (1983) interest is the construction and creation of situations where the absurd has its own logics. Her work involves commenting upon the human need to mystify nature. In the video work The Philosophers Stool, a restless and troubled figure is resting on a mountain peak. She, the philosopher, is leading us on a journey, moving back and forth inside her mind's fragile realms. While negotiating with her inner conflicts, she desperately attempts to find the reason for her digestive problems, which she believes are caused by a philosophical fallacy. Despite all her efforts, her ongoing monologue leads us nowhere, to nothing, nor to utopia.

 

The Philosopher's Stool
2013
HD video
00:09:25 

Joar Nango ja Tanya Busse

NORWAY / CANADA | Work in Tromsø

Joar Nango (1979) & Tanya Busse's (1982) work Extracted Suggestions deals with the symbolic aspects of the birch tree and its connections to science, economics and the idea of a Northern identity. In this project they have placed architectural add-ons onto birch trees throughout the city of Turku to extract syrup, and use concealment as a strategy for disappearance and non-privatization. Through the playful experimentation of collecting 30 litres of syrup, only a small crystalized sculpture remains. 

Extracted Suggestions

2013

installation

Bjargey Ólafsdóttir

ICELAND | Works in Reykjavík

Bjargey Ólafsdóttir (1972) moves easily between different techniques and media. She has worked, for example, with short films, poetry, music, drawings and photographs. For the work Gambanteinn she asked to collaborate with the farmer Ása Ketilsdóttir, who is known as a singer of traditional Icelandic music. By learning the songs and the particular way of singing them, Bjargey faces a double dream, her own and that of Ása, who in her youth dreamt of becoming an artist. 

Gambanteinn

2013

sound work

Katarina Reuter

FINLAND | Works in Raasepori

Katarina Reuter's (1964) series of paintings is connected very closely to her, to the environment of the home. She has observed the landscape right beside her, both directly and from inside. The work comprises 32 parts and is divided into 16 pairs of paintings. The paintings in ink on the top represent direct observation and the oil paintings below represent a more private perception of a place. At the very edge of perception is the third level of the paintings, the green colour behind them that is reflected on the wall and represents knowledge and awareness.

Limits of the World

2013

ink, oil and tempera on paper and wood

60 x 700 x 5 cm

Limits of the World

2013

ink, oil and tempera on paper and wood

60 x 700 x 5 cm

Limits of the World

2013

ink, oil and tempera on paper and wood

60 x 700 x 5 cm

Silja Sallé

ICELAND | Works in Reykjavík

Silja Sallé's (1970) work reflects her French-Icelandic origins. Her Icelandic roots from her mother's side have been central in her photographs since the beginning of her career. Through her photographs she exposes her strong feelings for the weather and the struggle between nature and the social and economic difficulties of everyday farming in contemporary rural Iceland.

Hjarðarfell, Eyja- og Miklaholtshreppi (Sheep)

2013

ink jet

160 x 230 cm

Hjarðarfell, Eyja- og Miklaholtshreppi (Dog)

2013

ink jet

43,5 x 65 cm 

Elina Saloranta

FINLAND | Works in Helsinki

Elina Saloranta's (1968) Morning is a video work and also a contemporary genre painting – an ‘interior painting’ depicting everyday life. Genre paintings had their roots in the Netherlands of the 17th century, but they were popular up until the end of the 19th century. In this exhibition Morning is paired with A Mother’s Joy, a genre painting by Adolf von Becker from 1868.

Morning

2013

video

00:21:30

Morning

2013

video

00:21:30